Encouragement for Parents with Chronically Ill Children

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Having a chronically ill child has killed my OCD; there’s literally not enough energy remaining in my body to lend to cleaning my house and ordering things as I am accustomed. Maybe “killed” is overstating a bit. It’s more like a deep suppression, which is worse. If the OCD were dead, it wouldn’t bother me how dirty my house gets! Nevertheless, the point is, I am no longer able to lend attention to detailing my house in a way that meets my approval. I’m severely embarrassed when someone stops by because of the common disarray.

As I’ve previously stated, it is exhausting caring for a chronically ill child, or any person for that matter. The medial tasks one could accomplish prior to their child becoming ill can no longer be done lest you pay an outside source. I’d give just about anything to have the money to hire a cleaning person twice a week. But, when all your money goes into the care of the child, there’s nothing much left, at least for the average family.

Here’s my point. To the parents with OCD who expect certain things of themselves to be executed a particular way at a certain time, allow yourself to let it go. There are, as a matter of fact, more important challenges to daily life than having a spotless house. Would I be more comfortable with a tidy house? Without question! Notwithstanding, I am no longer able to accomplish it. I’ve had to learn to rest regardless of the mess surrounding me. It doesn’t mean I never clean. It does, however, mean I don’t go into a dither when it isn’t done when I believe it should be. I have had to adapt to the circumstances because I surely haven’t discovered how to force life to adapt to my OCD.

Life is hard enough with an ill child, regardless of their malady. We need not heap further pressures to our schedules, especially when they have no real value. Your life and the life of your entire family superiorly outweigh the irritations of an untidy house. For me, learning to lay down the internal pressure of OCD was difficult, but altogether necessary. Rest is hard to come by with a sick child, so I choose to use my “down time” to rest instead of clean. It is of the utmost importance to be as rested as possible so as to not become unable to care for your child and other family members. Learning to let things go has been a huge step in my mental wellness. It really is okay to rest. Let’s not add heaviness to the yoke of life. I encourage you to lay down the stress.

Mark 6:31: He (Jesus) said…“Come to me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.”

 

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